In its 56th official year but with roots that date back to the 1895 the Venice Biennale is a historic and significant event on the world art stage. This year has been host to 53 countries and has, as always, bought some fantastic and jaw dropping works to the attention of world media. Following our director’s visit to event in May, here is a round up of some of our favourite photos and pavilions from this year’s epic event!

CHIHARU SHIOTA – JAPANESE PAVILLION

50,000 keys hang from the immersive cloud of vibrantly coloured string greeting visitors to this years Japan pavilion. The instillation explores the collective memory of those people across the globe who gave keys to the project, they also serve to remind the viewer that although they are familiar objects they represent an opportunity to explore the unknown.

SARAH LUCAS – BRITISH PAVILLION

Our very own Sarah Lucas, gaining respect and praise this year for her highly emotive art. Lucas uses gender, death, sex and the innuendo left residing in everyday objects to re-examine reoccurring themes within her work.

CÉLESTE BOURSIER-MOUGENOT – FRENCH PAVILION

Celeste Boursier-Mougenot brought three trees into the space, attached are their exposed roots and hidden wheels to allow the piece to slowly explore the space. The movement is dictated by the trees functions such as photosynthesis and sap flow. This highly imaginative piece allows plants and nature the autonomy to engage with its own environment, although reliant on technology the piece resonates with historic and traditional echoing’s.

CAMILLE NORMENT – NORDIC PAVILLION

Camille Norment explores states of dissonance within the context of time, space and socio-political encoding of sound. The multi-disciplinary nature of her work produces a series of examinations of the body, space and meaning assigned to the body through its negotiation with its surroundings. The result of this is an engaging psychological, physical and thought provoking visitor experience.

Camille Norment “Sound, like experience, is fleeting but it leaves traces in the mind and in the body. As such it is historic, and a viable tool for anticipating what is to come.”

MONICA BONVICINI – ITALIAN PAVILLION

Monica Bonvicini creates assemblages of chain saws cast in concrete and coated with black rubber for the 2015 Venice Biennale. Although critically acclaimed Bonvicini’s work is not known for its ease of understanding. Her oeuvre includes painting, sculpture and instillation, this often reflects upon ideas of sex, power and control in a humorous and somewhat ambiguous way.

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